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Q Podcast

Q educates and equips Christians to engage our cultural moment. Our method of learning is simple: exposure, conversation and collaboration. Listen to the Q Podcast to learn, explore and consider how you can be faithful in our cultural context.
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Now displaying: July, 2016
Jul 28, 2016

Often Christians complain about being misrepresented by mainstream media, but could that change with intentional efforts? Michael Cromartie, Vice President of the Ethics and Public Policy Center, has created opportunities for members of the national media to meet with evangelical leaders in hopes of getting the stories right. Filling a gap between faith, politics, and journalism, Michael promotes mutual understanding around the toughest, and many times misunderstood, issues of our time. 

Jul 21, 2016

Christians face an unprecedented landscape at the intersection of faith and public life. Over 46% of our neighbors believe religion and people of faith are part of the problem in our communities, not the solution. As a growing list of contentious issues present themselves on the cultural front—such as racism, gender, euthanasia, sexuality, religious freedom and more—the Church finds itself on the margins of the mainstream conversation perplexed about how to engage. Public opinion suggests our views and beliefs are irrelevant and extreme, so how should Christians respond? David Kinnaman will equip you to confidently engage the most difficult conversations in the days ahead with courage, conviction and compassion. 

Jul 7, 2016

Fashion matters. It influences the imagination and drives the way people uniquely represent themselves. The evolution of the women’s swimsuit is one place where there has been a visible shift away from modesty. In the current world of swimwear, small is often beautiful and less is considered more desirable. But designer and actress Jessica Rey asks, “Who says it has to be itsy bitsy?” Rey argues that within the construct of modesty, there is a freedom—that modesty isn't about covering up what's bad, but about revealing dignity. 

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